Rachel Neumeier

Fantasy and Young Adult Fantasy Author

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A Sword Named Truth

An interesting post about this book, by Sherwood Smith, at Bookview Cafe: All the Worlds and Time: The Long Arc

The initial story arc is divided into three books, called The Rise of the Alliance. The first book is A Sword Named Truth. After this arc comes another arc, when the main characters introduced in this series hit adulthood, and the world shifts into crisis. Then there is another arc about what happens after.

These all have been written—some of them redrafted several times. The toughest to redraft were actually these early ones, which contain story threads written forty, even fifty years ago. To work it together, I—a visual writer—had to learn a lot about narrative strategies. I read a metric butt ton of literary theory, venturing way out into Theory of Mind and Semiotics, which was fun, but taught me little, because visual writer.

So I ended up rereading pretty much all of the nineteenth century classics that developed the novel, focusing on the various levels of omniscient narrator. And that gave me my handle on pulling it all together….

Click through to read the whole thing. I have to say, I’m getting more interested in taking a look at A Sword Named Truth. That great title doesn’t hurt, either.

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2 Comments A Sword Named Truth

  1. Pete Mack

    I cannot fully reccommend this book. It is a bit reminiscent of the lesser McCaffrey novels, with less showing and more telling. There are a ton of characters, making it confusing. (I suppose it would be less so if you had recently read the related works, but I wasn’t expecting this in the first book of a trilogy.) I am also less than impressed by the way one of the central characters is assuming that her advisors know best, even though it is obvious to us that they don’t, and it is obvious to other children of her acquaintance as well. Not a well designed plot point. It isn’t one of Sherwood Smith’s best… Which doesn’t make it a bad book, but I was hoping for better

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