Rachel Neumeier

Fantasy and Young Adult Fantasy Author

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Perfect lairs for supervillians

Just stumbled across this. Really amazing what people build.

Nothing quite says “supervillain” like a submarine dry dock. This Royal Norwegian Navy auxiliary base located just outside the city of Tromsø offers roughly 145,000-square feet of above-ground buildings and 270,000-square feet of bombproof interior mountain space. Plus a submarine dry dock and hangar and an emergency tunnel system. Of course, a few sharks wouldn’t hurt. In 2012, the base was reportedly put up for sale for $17.5 million.

I’m sure that was a practical installation for Norway. Although if their navy sold it, maybe not. Question: who would BUY a submarine dry dock, other than a supervillain?

Or the Refuge du Goûter. They SAY it is a refuge for mountain climbers, but seriously? I mean, look at it! What you have there is is plainly a supervillain lair.

The most practical is probably that “home” in the Adirondacks, though. For a private home, it sure looks a LOT like a hidden supervillain lair.

Click through and enjoy!

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2 Comments Perfect lairs for supervillians

  1. Craig

    Well, there’s always the most expensive private home in the world, Antilia House in Bombay (or Mumbai, as they say these days):

    http://www.therichest.com/luxury/most-expensive/the-billion-dollar-home-of-mukesh-ambani/

    Of course, there are some indications that it’s *already* owned by a supervillain. Note that, besides being named after a mythical island in the Atlantic, 1) it has three helipads, which are illegal in Mumbai; 2) according to the linked story, the 168-car parking garage is also possibly illegal and …

    ..this is what gives it the true supervillain touch…

    3) The owner literally destroyed an orphage to build it:

    “Mohammed Arif Naseem Khan, the local minority affairs minister, told the state assembly that the plot had been illegally sold by a children’s charity which ran an orphanage on the site.

    A spokesman for Mr Ambani’s Reliance Industries Limited said the dispute was a matter between the charity and the Waqf Board. “It was always the property of the Waqf,” he said. The orphans living at the home were moved to another property at the time of the sale.” The charity has denied any wrongdoing.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/8678232/Richest-man-in-India-may-lose-27-storey-home.html

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